Words! Words! Words!

Still on the Road With ProofreadNOW.com

Posted by Phil Jamieson   Jun 25, 2020 9:41:34 AM

We’re still on the road across the rugged West and beautiful Midwest of the U.S.A. Some fields are corn, some are wheat, some are barley, some are hay, and some are something else. There are cows, horses, sheep, buffalo, and antelope roaming and grazing as far as the eye can see. Every field is an awesome sight. If you’re one who thinks corn, steaks, sausage, and flour magically originate at the grocery store, you’ll be at a disadvantage in this week’s quiz. Try hard anyway, and be sure to look for a local farm stand next time you need some eggs or milk.

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Topics: vocabulary test, vocabulary, word quiz, vocabulary quiz

On the Road With ProofreadNOW.com

Posted by Phil Jamieson   Jun 19, 2020 9:26:52 AM

St. Louis, Missouri ArchWe’re literally on the road this week, traveling across this great country called America. As we travel the highways and byways, we are often curious about how geographical names came about. Ever wonder, for example, where the word ‘Appalachia’ came from? We find this on Wikipedia: “While exploring inland along the northern coast of Florida in 1528, the members of the Narváez expedition, including Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, found a Native American village near present-day Tallahassee, Florida, whose name they transcribed as Apalchen or Apalachen. The name was soon altered by the Spanish to Apalachee and used as a name for the tribe and region spreading well inland to the north." And you thought it was French for ‘toothless banjo player.’ Well, try your hand at our non-extensive list of some well-known places, and see where you end up. (Definitions according to Wikipedia.)

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Topics: vocabulary, word quiz, vocabulary quiz

TOTE (Take Our Test - Encore)

Posted by Phil Jamieson   Jun 12, 2020 11:01:48 AM

We got great emails about last week’s post, all about acronyms and initialisms. Well, we’re going to do it again this week. List some more. Get you guessing. Answering your lifelong wonderments. LTIP (Last time, I promise).

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Topics: vocabulary test, vocabulary, word quiz, vocabulary quiz

Reaching New Heights

Posted by Phil Jamieson   May 1, 2020 12:09:09 PM

On May 1, 1931, President Herbert Hoover officially dedicated New York City’s Empire State Building, pressing a button from the White House that turned on the building’s lights. Hoover’s gesture, of course, was symbolic; while the president remained in Washington, D.C., someone else flicked the switches in New York. On this day in 1960, an American U-2 spy plane was shot down while conducting espionage over the Soviet Union. The incident derailed an important summit meeting between President Dwight D. Eisenhower and Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev that was scheduled for later that month. Let’s see how high and how fast you can go with today’s word quiz. Be sure not to bail out before you finish!

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Topics: vocabulary test, vocabulary, word quiz

A Founding, a Downing, and a Stolen Crowning

Posted by Phil Jamieson   Apr 21, 2020 10:39:39 AM

 

According to tradition, on April 21, 753 B.C., Romulus and his twin brother, Remus, founded Rome on the site where they were suckled by a she-wolf as orphaned infants. Would you believe there is a coin in the Louvre dated April 21, 753 B.C., commemorating the founding? In 1918, in the skies above France, Baron Manfred von Richthofen, the notorious German flying ace known as the “Red Baron,” was killed by Allied fire (and not by Snoopy). In 1836, at the Battle of San Jacinto, the Texas militia under the leadership of Sam Houston routed Mexican forces led by General Santa Anna. And in 1980, Rosie Ruiz faked her win in the Boston Marathon. She actually jumped into the race about a mile before the finish line. Poor Rosie was crowned the winner, only to be shamed and disqualified a week later. See if you can get ALL the words in today’s quiz. Don’t start at #9 and think you can win.

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Topics: vocabulary test, vocabulary, vocabulary quiz

The Famous Date of April 15

Posted by Phil Jamieson   Apr 15, 2020 2:06:49 PM

The date April 15 is loaded with good and bad. The most recent good is that this year, it’s NOT Tax Day in the US, what with the COVID situation and all! And on this day in 1947, the great Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in major league baseball. But also on this day, the Titanic sank in 1912, the so-called Boston Bombers killed three spectators at the Boston Marathon and injured many more in 2013, and President Abraham Lincoln died after being shot the night before by John Wilkes Booth in 1865. See if you can apply your vocabulary skills for better or worse today in our quiz.

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Topics: vocabulary test, vocabulary, vocabulary quiz

Observation, Opportunity, Decision, and Disaster, All in One

Posted by Phil Jamieson   Nov 12, 2019 8:54:18 AM

On this day in 1799, Andrew Ellicott, an early American astronomer, witnessed the Leonids meteor shower from a ship off the Florida Keys. Ellicott’s journal entry is the first known record of a meteor shower in North America. In 1954, Ellis Island, the gateway to America, shut its doors after processing more than 12 million immigrants since opening in 1892. On this day in 1979, President Jimmy Carter responded to a potential threat to national security by stopping the importation of petroleum from Iran. And on this day in 2001, an American Airlines flight out of John F. Kennedy (JFK) Airport in New York City crashed into a Queens neighborhood after takeoff, killing 265 people.

See if your vocabulary skills light up the sky with your brilliance or cover you in a coat of slippery, good ol’ American oil.

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Topics: vocabulary, vocabulary quiz

Presidential heroes and a celebrity zero.

Posted by Phil Jamieson   Jun 12, 2018 7:30:10 AM

On June 12, 1944, Lieutenant John F. Kennedy received the U.S. Navy’s highest honor for gallantry for his heroic actions as a gunboat pilot during World War II. The future president also received a Purple Heart for wounds received during battle. On June 12, 1987, in one of his most famous Cold War speeches, President Ronald Reagan challenged Soviet Leader Mikhail Gorbachev to tear down the Berlin Wall, a symbol of the repressive Communist era in a divided Germany. And on June 12, 1994, “someone” murdered Nicole Brown Simpson and Ron Goldman in California. That someone has never been convicted in a criminal court.

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Topics: vocabulary, vocabulary quiz

It’s March 20. Get ready to put some spring in your step. But first some dark history.

Posted by Phil Jamieson   Mar 20, 2018 9:11:41 AM

According to scholars at the University of Paris, the Black Death is created on this day in 1345, from what they call “a triple conjunction of Saturn, Jupiter and Mars in the 40th degree of Aquarius, occurring on the 20th of March 1345.″ The Black Death, also known as the Plague, swept across Europe, the Middle East and Asia during the 14th century, leaving an estimated 25 million dead in its wake. Harriet Beecher Stowe’s anti-slavery novel, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, was published on this day in 1852. The novel sold 300,000 copies within three months and was so widely read that when President Abraham Lincoln met Stowe in 1862, he reportedly said, “So this is the little lady who made this big war.” And on this day in 1861, President Abraham Lincoln’s sons, Willie and Tad, are diagnosed with the measles, adding to the president’s many troubles.

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Topics: vocabulary test, vocabulary, vocabulary quiz

Key to survival: Rock and roll with the punches

Posted by Phil Jamieson   Mar 13, 2018 7:30:00 AM

On March 13, 1965, guitar legend Eric Clapton left the Yardbirds to chase the Blues. On this date in 1992, a 6.8-magnitude earthquake struck in Turkey, killing (by some estimates) 2,000 people. And on this date in 1868, the impeachment trial of President Andrew Johnson began. Let’s see how unshakable your vocab skills are today. Will they stand up to trial? Will you strum a positive chord?

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Topics: vocabulary, vocabulary quiz

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